Water & Environment Centre (WEC) | P.O. Box 13886 Sana’a University | Ma’een Office | Sana’a Yemen

Sympathy and Condolence

Written:

27 April 2016

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Sympathy and Condolence

With hearts full of faith, The Water and Environment Center offers its deepest condolences and

sympathy for the death of the deceased,

Prof. “Abdullah Saleh Babaqi”

who passed away on Sunday, 24 April, 2016

We ask God Almighty to bestow his mercy and eternal peace on his soul

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Evaluation of the current and potential waste water reuse. A demonstration plot at Sana’a WWTP

Written:

10 February 2016

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Within the water partnership activities between WEC and the water sectors, the seminar titled (Evaluation of the current and potential waste water reuse. A demonstration plot at Sana’a WWTP) was Held on Wednesday 10/2/2016 at the Water and the Environment Center.

In this study, A Demonstration plot was applied inside the yard of the Sana’a wastewater treatment plant (SWWTP) in order to study/mimic and evaluate  the current  uses of  sewage emerging from Sana’a treatment plant as well which sometime discharged from un-treated due to the overloading of the treatment plant. The irrigation is applied with mixing with the Groundwater  to study the alleviation of the alternate irrigation to  public health and the environment. Two crops namely squash (cucarpite spp.) and Alfalfa (alfalfa spp.) were  planted and irrigated using seven water quality treatments levels as follows: Groundwater from a well at the SWWTP yard (GW) – as a control,  Treated wastewater effluent from the open channel (WW),  Raw wastewater (RWW),  Raw ww with alternating GW (RWW+GW),   Treated ww with alternating GW (WW+GW), Groundwater with adding needed nutrients using treated ww (GW_WWF) Groundwater with adding needed nutrients using raw ww (GW+RWWF). the total production of Alfalfa crop which was harvested only once at the end of the period. At the same time, the total production of the  Squash crops for total three harvesting times. The Results of soil analysis before planting showed significant increase in organic matter after applying the wastewater with different treatments which was reflected into soil fertility, while the rest of the analysis didn’t show significant difference may be due to the available nutrients and pathogens in the soil before planting. It is concluded that irrigating with wastewater either raw or treated is beneficial, while on the other hand it is advised to raise the plant from the soil so that it does not get in contact with the pathogens in the wastewater. Regarding to the contaminated surface of the crops, it should be noted that it should be washed with chlorine to remove the FC adsorbed before it is marketed.


Analyzing the Potential of Rooftop Rainwater Harvesting Systems for Water Supply in Manakha town and Surrounding Area

Written:

28 December 2015

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Within the water partnership activities between the sectors of water, the seminar titled (Analyzing the Potential of Rooftop Rainwater Harvesting Systems for Water Supply in Manakha town and Surrounding Area) was Held on Monday 28-12-2015 at the Water and the Environment Center.

This study was conducted to analyze the potential of Rooftop Rainwater Harvesting Systems to supply Manakha area with water; through assessing the technical, economic and social feasibility, and through introducing these systems there to meet domestic water needs and reduce the pressure on groundwater resources and household’s financial resources.

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Rain water Harvesting from Rooftop In Urban Areas – Case study: Sana’a City

Written:

28 October 2015

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Website manager

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News & events


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Within the water partnership activities between the sectors of water, the seminar titled (Rain water Harvesting from Rooftop In Urban Areas – Case study: Sana’a City) was Held on Wednesday 28-10-2015 at the Water and the Environment Center.

In this study the roof water harvesting from the urban area in the Sana’a city especially from the roofs of schools will be evaluated qualitative and quantitative to meet the minimum requirements of water need for drinking and hygiene. Around 11.0*106 of rainwater can be harvested from all Rooftops buildings of the city of Sanaá where the rainfall is around 250mm. This amount of harvested rain water will cover approximately 17% of the water demand of the population of the city of Sana’a and will reduce the pressure on groundwater, which is deteriorating quantitatively and qualitatively.

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